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Does Your Nail Polish Cause Cancer?

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A recent study found triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) in women’s bodies who painted their nails.

Nail polish dates back to 3000 BC China. During the Ming dynasty many nail polishes were made of beeswax, egg whites, vegetable dyes, and gun Arabic combinations. Fingernail and toenail polish has been used over the centuries to decorate and protect the nail bed. In many cases the nails have been an artist’s palette.

Today nail polishes contain “a film forming polymer with a volatile organic solvent. Nitrocellulose that is dissolved in butyl acetate or ethyl acetate is common.” (1)

TPHP (also called TPP) is used in plastics making and fire retardant in furniture and causes endocrine disruption. Endocrine disruptions are hormone function irregularities that can lead to reproductive and developmental problems to include cancers.

Use EWGs Skin Deep Cosmetics Database to check your nail polish brand.

Read through this article and share what you think.

A study co-authored by researchers at Duke University and EWG has detected evidence of a common nail polish chemical called triphenyl phosphate, or TPHP, in the bodies of every woman who volunteered to paint her nails for the study.

The results represent compelling evidence that TPHP, a suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical also used in plastics manufacturing and as a fire retardant in foam furniture, enters the human body via nail polish. These results are troubling because a growing body of scientific data from other studies indicates that TPHP causes endocrine disruption, meaning that it interferes with normal hormone functioning. In animal studies, it has caused reproductive and developmental irregularities.  (Some studies use the acronym TPP for this chemical.)

TPHP is listed on the ingredient labels of a wide array of nail polishes now on the market. Fully 49 percent of more than 3,000 nail polishes and treatments compiled in EWG’s Skin Deep database disclose that they contain TPHP. Even worse, some polishes contain it but don’t disclose it.

NAILED_ListofBrands2

The Duke-EWG study, published October 19, 2015 in Environment International, tested 10 nail polishes in all for TPHP and found it in eight of them.

Importantly, two of the eight polishes that tested positive for TPHP did not disclose its presence on product labels. …. The concentrations in the eight nail polishes with TPHP ranged from 0.49 percent to 1.68 percent by weight.  Clear polishes generally contained more TPHP than colored polishes.

The study found that when women applied nail polish with TPHP directly to their nails, the levels of a biomarker of that chemical in their urine increased sharply. Technically, the researchers tested the women’s urine for a chemical called diphenyl phosphate or DPHP, which is created when the body metabolizes TPHP.….

Nail polish manufacturers may have turned to TPHP as a replacement plasticizer for dibutyl phthalate, or DBP, that was added to polish to improve flexibility. This chemical fell out of use in nail polish because highly publicized scientific studies showed that DBP and other phthalates are likely endocrine disruptors and toxic to the reproductive system.

….Normally, most molecules do not permeate nails (Gupchup 1999). The researchers theorized that other polish ingredients such as solvents rendered nails more absorbent. They also suspected that the network of capillaries in the cuticle that surrounds the nail might play a role in carrying the chemical into the body.

….These results indicate that nail polish may be an important contributor to short-term TPHP exposure. For frequent users of nail polish, exposure to TPHP may be a long-term hazard.

Use EWGs Skin Deep Cosmetics Database to check your nail polish brand.

Thank you EWG, source for the full article.

TPHP Brands Source          Featured Image

Footnote (1) Source

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